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"All sins are attempts to fill voids" - Simone Weil

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We thought, where are any empty places in London? - Telephone boxes.

This made us think of the old fashioned  prostitute posters and sex lines that use to cover the inside of the telephone boxes. This in a sense fills the space of the telephone box, but less literally, the people ringing try to fill the "void" of their lives with meaningless girls and phone calls.

This British iconic symbol that use to be used to objectify and exploit women, however they are now left to stand alone.

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We were told on the first day that Graphic Design was about persuading, provoking and intriguing the audience

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prop for photo;

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Our posters:

After the talk with the tutor we decided against these as they didn't have any clear message behind putting them up and they also were a bit too obvious and provocative for what we wee trying to achieve.

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We thought we should take a different stance and looked at feminine exploitation through these crude and bright images.

Relevant issues related to the message we want to portray;

Cat Call video:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-HI4DC18wCg

The controversial issue when David Cameron refuses to wear the t-shirt captioned "this is what a feminist looks like".

We thought, to mimic the bright and in your face colours of the prostitute cards, we could use bright paper. Then to juxtapose this idea, to use feminine imagery and feminist symbols to highlight the vulgarity and show how wrong using women like this is even though the bright card is eye catching.

 

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Typography was an inspiration for some of the symbols we came up with;

.) (.     !     Y

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Location:

We wanted to find a telephone box in a purposefully very male setting, one surrounded by offices maybe.

We found one in Jermyn Street, with a suit shop in the background an business men going back and forth at lunch time.

This contrast makes the feminine imagery much more significant.

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Our chosen telephone box

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The eventual diminishing of the purpose of the telephone box has meant some have been put up for sale, some creatively recycled and repurposed in surprising ways, others transformed into urban art exhibits.

 

 One of the most celebrated examples is the kiosk in Westbury-sub-Mendip (above left), transformed into the smallest library in Britain.

According to the BBC: “BT has received 770 applications for communities to ‘adopt a kiosk’, and so far 350 boxes have been handed over to parish councils”. 

From the local and the homemade (above) to grand designs and professionally commissioned installations (below), these recycled artworks reflect the popularity of the red boxes in the national psyche and the importance connected to them still.

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Other similar Urban Art

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Other similar Urban Art

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This is our video of putting up the work and people's reactions to it.

We found it very interesting to see people's reactions to it; mostly oblivious and ignorant to it, getting on with their own lives, but others curious and intrigued by it. Interestingly enough most of the people who really took an interest in it were female, this could have just been a coincidence or it could suggest how women are much more aware of the type of discrimination we were trying to signify, recognizing the symbols as female imagery or it could just be a comment on the way women pay a lot more attention to their surroundings than men usually do. 

By making the video look a bit CCTV like, we were trying to establish how everyday discrimination against women is and how common place it is. The lack of audio in the video also mimics the CCTV like aspect.

 

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