40 hours

40 hours

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The Saatchi Gallery

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Vladimir Kozin

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Peter Halley "prison"

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The piece above furthest left is really inspiring for the 40 hours project. I want to look at the repetitiveness and monotony of the everyday cycle of life and I think this really shows the way that office buildings are the epitome of the lack of creativity of humanity in suits 

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I really liked the piece above. It seemed simple, and almost amateur-esq when I first saw it from far away in the gallery but looking up close it makes you question your humanity and takes a cynical view of consumerism and contracts. The grid and number of them emphasise the vapidity of the message the artist is trying portray, making it seem as selling your soul to a company is not a unique act but an act of no significance to the corporate world.

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Hiroshi Sugimoto "theatre"

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I think this is a really cool way to record time. He developed a set of photos for the length of a film, exposed it just using the light from the film. Essentially a photo of a film.

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Sam Taylor Wood "still life"

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Time of my life video. Took 17 years, one photo a day

In Muybridge's day a single exposure could take minutes in those days, but the state-of-the-art cameras managed all 12 shots in less than half a second. Within 20 minutes, Muybridge had developed the plates and laid out the results for the visitors to admire. The series made a brief filmstrip of the horse's progress along the track--capturing, for the first time, ephemeral details the eye couldn't pick out at such speeds, such as the position of the legs and the angle of the tail. Stanford got the evidence he wanted, and the world got a stunning dissection of motion. "It was a brilliant success," one reporter wrote. "Even the threadlike tip of Mr. Marvin's whip was plainly seen in each negative, and the horse was exactly pictured."

Those hoofbeats reverberated in art and science and are still being heard today. In pursuing for Stanford the secrets of equine gait, Muybridge unwittingly set the stage for a spectacular invention a decade later--the motion picture. The racehorse experiment also taught scientists to see photos as data, launching the study of animal locomotion. And the images shook the art world by exposing postural errors in classic equine sculptures and paintings.

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Gillian Wearing "60 minute silence"

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I think this is a very clever way to get the audience involved with something that is fun but also has an inherent time theme behind it. The audience are allowed to ultimately choose what they want whilst sticking to strict guidelines of time. a schedule

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joesph beuys "i like america and america like me"

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Christian Marclay "the clock"

This is such an interesting way to portray time through film. Montaging and collaging film clips that mention time and putting them together to create a real time clock. Creating your own clock is an ingenious thing

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heather ackroyd and dan harvey dilston grove church

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The use of grass in a piece of art automatically involves the sense of time. Original use for something so normally mundane.

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Andy Goldsworthy

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Like the use of grass, ice also involves time immediately. The melting of it and transience of the piece of art and the awareness of this means the piece uses time to make it more fragile and treasured

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Richard Long "sixty minute walk on Dartmoor"

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I found this gallery really interesting, I loved the space and openness of it. This exhibition was really intriguing. Erotic, encapsulating, feminine, vulgar, dancing. Tights stretched and filled with sand. Who knew?

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Time is in control. It defines what we do and the eventual acceptance and continual knowledge that you cant overpower it and it will in the end take you, makes who you are and what we choose to do.

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HA Schult’s haunting ‘trash people’ have graced the streets of many of the world’s most major cities … silently open to interpretation as they travel the world and sit everywhere from the parks of New York City to the Great Wall of China. It took Schult 6 months and 30 assistants to create these strange sculptures from crushed cans, computer parts and virtually anything else he could appropriate to assemble them. What is their purpose and meaning? It is difficult to say, but they are certainly trans-cultural and intended to engage, inspire and engender reflection in those who see them and are a foil to see the reactions of different nations and groups of people.

No escaping that the more time goes on the more waste or litter we leave and the deeper the trace we leave is.

Time is rubbish?

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I was thinking of categorising the rubbish and litter I collect  over the week like Wherli, making order out of chaos

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Is time money, or money time?

 

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Why do we use money, try to earn more of it, and spend it? At its most basic definition, money is a store of time. Our bosses or customers hire us to save them time; we hire others to save us time. Could I go and raise a cow, feed it a healthy all-grass diet, slaughter it, butcher it and store it for future consumption? Absolutely, but it would take me a lot of time to do it myself. Instead, I save time by paying someone else who does cattle husbandry more efficiently than I can: they do it in less time.

Everything we redeem money for is, in essence, us taking that stored time from the past and redeeming it to save time today.

Whatever the argument, no one can disagree that the more time you have the more money, and vice versa. The two are unconditionally and forever linked.

This may be a very cynical view of the world today but it is what humanity are always striving for. Whether it be to increase their time of their amount of money, these two things are integral to the drive and want of human beings.

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Pedro Silmon

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A brief history of time measurement:

http://nrich.maths.org/6070

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Even though the regularity of a grid would couple the repetitivity I am trying to recreate I am deciding to go with the wheel or clock shape as a format. The idea of going round and round never stopping or coming to a conclusion means that, in the same way that life and the busyness of everyday life in a city environment never sleeps. The Hint of a clock also reinhances the idea of time and how it is in control of our world and what we do adding to the monotony of the black and white images.

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An example of some of the photos i have been taking

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Materials I will use;

  • Black and white photos I have taken over the last week.
  • Black spray paint
  • Receipts I have collected over the last week
  • tracing paper
  • Bits of rubbish I have collected
  • Masking tape
  • Black marker pen
  • Black acrylic paint
  • Black ink
  • Black card

 

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I thought it wasn't enough to just make the poster but locate it in the environment that I was trying to replicate and capture the atmosphere of what the poster symbolises.

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